Purpose

Alcohol use is a significant problem among Latinxs and immigration-related stress increases risk for substance use. A theoretically-based cultural adaptation of motivational interviewing (CAMI) that specifically integrated discussion of immigration-related stressors (e.g., stigma, social isolation) resulted in significant reductions in alcohol-related harms for those Latinx heavy drinkers with high discrimination compared to standard MI, and reduced anxiety and depressive symptoms one year later compared to MI. Rigorous tests that examine theoretically-informed adaptation of efficacious addiction interventions are not common, yet are needed to advance implementation science. This Hybrid Type 1 Effectiveness-Implementation study will investigate the feasibility of implementing CAMI in a real-world clinical setting. The key questions are: Would CAMI have positive effects among individuals who use both drugs and alcohol? How do providers view this intervention? The investigators will collaborate with a primary care center that serves a mainly Latinx client population to train their Community Wellness Advocates (CWAs) to deliver CAMI to patients who are heavy drinkers. The investigators will conduct a concurrent investigation on the process of implementing CAMI in primary care - a two-arm randomized clinical effectiveness trial will enroll Latinx heavy drinkers (18 years or older) in primary care who use alcohol (and may use other drugs) - and follow them for 12 months after the intervention. Specific Aims are: (1) To examine the impact of CAMI plus a booster session (vs. assessment only) on outcomes: % heavy drinking days, frequency of alcohol-related consequences, depressive/anxiety symptoms, and number of illicit drug use days, using a Hybrid Type 1 Effectiveness-Implementation design and (2) To gather indicators of implementation outcome from multiple stakeholders using a mixed-methods approach. The investigators will follow Curran's framework to evaluate the process of implementation and Proctor's framework to measure implementation outcomes. This study, a first to examine the acceptability of culturally-adapted addiction treatments in primary care settings, will answer essential questions on implementing evidence-based care for Latinxs that can improve health disparities related to substance use. Long term goals are to translate the lessons from this Hybrid study to the broader community to focus on population health for all primary care patients.

Conditions

Eligibility

Eligible Ages
Between 18 Years and 65 Years
Eligible Genders
All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers
Yes

Inclusion Criteria

  • 4/5 or more drinks/occasion (female/male, respectively) 1+ days/month AND/OR AUDIT score of 8+ for men and 6+ for women - Age 18 or older - Identify as Latinx - First or second-generation immigrants

Exclusion Criteria

  • Current psychotic symptoms - Cognitive impairment - Currently in psychosocial treatment for alcohol use disorder - Patients who have been enrolled in the Complex Care Management (CCM) Program for 3 months or longer.

Study Design

Phase
N/A
Study Type
Interventional
Allocation
Randomized
Intervention Model
Parallel Assignment
Intervention Model Description
Clinical effectiveness trial that tests two conditions (CAMI plus booster + standard care compared to assessment + standard care). Health outcomes are reduced drinking, related harms and improvement of mental health. Follow-up at 3,6, and 12 months.
Primary Purpose
Treatment
Masking
Double (Participant, Outcomes Assessor)
Masking Description
Participants will be randomized to one of two conditions. They will be unaware of their randomization condition. The Research assistant conducting follow-ups will be unaware of the participant's treatment condition.

Arm Groups

ArmDescriptionAssigned Intervention
Experimental
CAMI/CAMI booster
Culturally Adapted Motivational Interview. Participants will receive a single session, 75 minute addiction counseling discussion that focuses on the causes of addictive behavior. They will receive a CAMI booster session at 2 months and standard care in a primary care setting.
  • Other: CAMI
    The CAMI is a culturally adapted motivational interview. It is a single 75 minute session that focuses on promoting motivation to change drinking and drug use behavior.
No Intervention
Control
Assessment plus standard care. Participants will complete an assessment, including measures on drinking and drug use. They will also receive standard care in a primary care setting.

Recruiting Locations

Boston Medical Center
Boston, Massachusetts 02215
Contact:
Christine Pace, MD
CHRISTINE.PACE@BMC.ORG

More Details

Status
Recruiting
Sponsor
Boston University Charles River Campus

Study Contact

Christina S Lee, PhD
617 353 1415
leecs@bu.edu

Detailed Description

Alcohol use is a significant problem among Latinxs because of the disproportionate burden of physical harms and negative consequences associated with substance use relative to other racial/ethnic groups. Factors associated with the stress related to being an immigrant increase risk for substance use. A theoretically-based cultural adaptation of motivational interviewing (CAMI) that specifically integrated discussion of stressors related to immigration (e.g., discrimination, stigma, social isolation) resulted in significant reductions in harms related to alcohol for those Latinx heavy drinkers with high discrimination compared to standard MI, and reduced anxiety and depressive symptoms one year later compared to MI. Rigorous tests that examine theoretically-informed adaptation of efficacious interventions for addictions are not common, yet are needed to advance implementation science because they address questions that are the basis for successful implementation. The proposed Hybrid Type 1 Effectiveness-Implementation study is an important next step in this line of research, which is to investigate the feasibility of implementing the CAMI intervention in a real-world clinical setting. The key questions are: Would CAMI have positive effects among individuals who use both drugs and alcohol? How do providers view this intervention? The investigators will collaborate with a primary care center that serves a mainly Latinx client population to train their Community Wellness Advocates (CWAs) to deliver the CAMI to patients who are heavy drinkers. The investigators will conduct a concurrent investigation on the process of implementing the CAMI in primary care - a two-arm randomized clinical effectiveness trial will enroll Latinx heavy drinkers (18 years or older) in primary care who use alcohol (and may use other drugs) - and follow them for 12 months after the intervention. Specific Aims are: (1) To examine the impact of CAMI plus an in- person booster session (vs. assessment only) on outcomes: % heavy drinking days, frequency of alcohol- related consequences, depressive/anxiety symptoms, and number of illicit drug use days, using a Hybrid Type 1 Effectiveness-Implementation design and (2) To gather indicators of implementation outcome from multiple stakeholders using a mixed-methods approach. The investigators will follow Curran's framework to evaluate the process of implementation and Proctor's framework to measure implementation outcomes: acceptability, adoption, intervention appropriateness, feasibility, overall cost (i.e., CAMI vs. assessment only), and treatment fidelity. This study, a first to examine the acceptability of culturally-adapted addiction treatments in primary care settings, will answer essential questions on implementing evidence-based care for Latinxs that can improve health disparities related to substance use. Long term goals are to translate the lessons from the proposed Hybrid study to the broader community to focus on population health for all primary care patients.

Notice

Study information shown on this site is derived from ClinicalTrials.gov (a public registry operated by the National Institutes of Health). The listing of studies provided is not certain to be all studies for which you might be eligible. Furthermore, study eligibility requirements can be difficult to understand and may change over time, so it is wise to speak with your medical care provider and individual research study teams when making decisions related to participation.