Purpose

This two phase study is testing an online version of a transdiagnostic, cognitive behavioral therapy, against a modified version of that therapy emphasizing positive affect. The first phase of the trial will focus on content development for the modified therapy and the second phase will be a randomized control trial comparing the two.

Conditions

Eligibility

Eligible Ages
Over 18 Years
Eligible Genders
All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers
No

Inclusion Criteria

Diagnosed with a DSM-5 anxiety, obsessive-compulsive, or depressive disorder

Exclusion Criteria

Acute risk factors (suicidal or homicidal ideation or clinical condition requiring immediate treatment); The individual is in treatment elsewhere for related issues; and/or The individual is unable or unwilling to commit to the study procedures.

Study Design

Phase
N/A
Study Type
Interventional
Allocation
Randomized
Intervention Model
Parallel Assignment
Primary Purpose
Treatment
Masking
None (Open Label)

Arm Groups

ArmDescriptionAssigned Intervention
Active Comparator
Unified Protocol (UP)
The Unified Protocol (UP) is a transdiagnostic, cognitive-behavioral therapy that has been shown to be effective for treating emotional disorders. The UP targets negative emotions and helps people respond to their emotions in ways that are more helpful for them and in line with their goals. This will be delivered entirely on an online platform.
  • Behavioral: Unified Protocol
    A transdiagnostic, cognitive behavioral therapy.
Experimental
Modified Unified Protocol (UP+)
A modified version of the UP (called the UP+) delivered entirely on an online platform that will include exercises specifically designed to enhance positive emotions.
  • Behavioral: Modified Unified Protocol (UP+)
    A transdiagnostic, cognitive behavioral therapy.

Recruiting Locations

Center for Anxiety and Related Disorders - Boston University
Boston, Massachusetts 02115
Contact:
Todd J Farchione, PhD
627-353-9610

More Details

Status
Recruiting
Sponsor
Boston University Charles River Campus

Study Contact

Todd Farchione, Ph.D.
617-353-9609
tfarchio@bu.edu

Detailed Description

Research shows that positive emotions can buffer against the effects of stress as well as contribute to overall well-being and functioning. People with emotional disorders, such as anxiety and depression, often report lower levels of positive emotions. However, to date, most existing treatment approaches for emotional disorders focus on regulating negative emotions, without explicitly focusing on positive emotions. The Unified Protocol (UP) is a transdiagnostic, cognitive-behavioral therapy that has been shown to be effective for treating emotional disorders. The UP targets negative emotions and helps people respond to their emotions in ways that are more helpful for them and in line with their goals. In its current form, the UP does not explicitly target positive emotions, but some research suggests that individuals treated with the UP and other cognitive-behavioral treatments experience some improvement in positive affect. In the current study, the researchers will create a modified version of the UP (called the UP+) delivered entirely on an online platform that will include exercises specifically designed to enhance positive emotions. Then, the researchers will evaluate the UP+ in a small sample of participants to examine acceptability and feasibility and will then use this information to continue to refine the protocol. Finally, the researchers will conduct a randomized controlled trial to assess the efficacy of the UP+. Participants diagnosed with emotional disorders will be randomized to either receive the UP or the UP+ delivered on an online platform and will be assessed on a range of outcomes, including positive and negative affect, psychological symptoms, and functional outcomes.

Notice

Study information shown on this site is derived from ClinicalTrials.gov (a public registry operated by the National Institutes of Health). The listing of studies provided is not certain to be all studies for which you might be eligible. Furthermore, study eligibility requirements can be difficult to understand and may change over time, so it is wise to speak with your medical care provider and individual research study teams when making decisions related to participation.